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1 : A short dressing jacket for women.

2 : A kind of straitjacket.

3 : a box, or vase, with a perforated cover to emit perfumes.

4 : of Console

5 : To cheer in distress or depression; to alleviate the grief and raise the spirits of; to relieve; to comfort; to soothe.

6 : A bracket whose projection is not more than half its height.

7 : Any small bracket; also, a console table.

8 : One who gives consolation.

9 : See Gasoline.

10 : See Heliotrope.

11 : A variety of opal which is usually milk white, bluish white, or sky blue; but in a bright light it reflects a reddish color.

12 : The inside sole of a boot or shoe; also, a loose, thin strip of leather, felt, etc., placed inside the shoe for warmth or ease.

13 : The quality of being unusual or novel.

14 : The quality of being insolent; pride or haughtiness manifested in contemptuous and overbearing treatment of others; arrogant contempt; brutal impudence.

15 : Insolent conduct or treatment; insult.

16 : To insult.

17 : Insolence.

18 : Deviating from that which is customary; novel; strange; unusual.

19 : Haughty and contemptuous or brutal in behavior or language; overbearing; domineering; grossly rude or disrespectful; saucy; as, an insolent master; an insolent servant.

20 : Proceeding from or characterized by insolence; insulting; as, insolent words or behavior.

21 : In an insolent manner.

22 : A large British fluke, or flounder (Rhombus megastoma); -- called also carter, and whiff.

23 : Pertaining to a mausoleum; monumental.

24 : of Mausoleum

25 : A magnificent tomb, or stately sepulchral monument.

26 : Same as Thomsonite.

27 : To become obsolescent.

28 : The state of becoming obsolete.

29 : Going out of use; becoming obsolete; passing into desuetude.

30 : No longer in use; gone into disuse; disused; neglected; as, an obsolete word; an obsolete statute; -- applied chiefly to words, writings, or observances.

31 : Not very distinct; obscure; rudimental; imperfectly developed; abortive.

32 : To become obsolete; to go out of use.

33 : In an obsolete manner.

34 : The state of being obsolete, or no longer used; a state of desuetude.

35 : Indistinctness; want of development.

36 : A disused word or phrase; an archaism.

37 : The outside sole of a boot or shoe.

38 : A small parasol.

39 : A small ball of rich minced meat or fish, covered with pastry and fried.

40 : Any one of several species of flatfishes of the genus Solea and allied genera of the family Soleidae, especially the common European species (Solea vulgaris), which is a valuable food fish.

41 : Any one of several American flounders somewhat resembling the true sole in form or quality, as the California sole (Lepidopsetta bilineata), the long-finned sole (Glyptocephalus zachirus), and other species.

42 : The bottom of the foot; hence, also, rarely, the foot itself.

43 : The bottom of a shoe or boot, or the piece of leather which constitutes the bottom.

44 : The bottom or lower part of anything, or that on which anything rests in standing.

45 : The bottom of the body of a plow; -- called also slade; also, the bottom of a furrow.

46 : The horny substance under a horse's foot, which protects the more tender parts.

47 : The bottom of an embrasure.

48 : A piece of timber attached to the lower part of the rudder, to make it even with the false keel.

49 : The seat or bottom of a mine; -- applied to horizontal veins or lodes.

50 : of Sole

(50) words is found which contain sole in our database

For sole word found data is following....

1 : Camisole

n.

A short dressing jacket for women.

2 : Camisole

n.

A kind of straitjacket.

3 : Cassolette

n.

a box, or vase, with a perforated cover to emit perfumes.

4 : Consoled

imp. & p. p.

of Console

5 : Console

v. t.

To cheer in distress or depression; to alleviate the grief and raise the spirits of; to relieve; to comfort; to soothe.

6 : Console

n.

A bracket whose projection is not more than half its height.

7 : Console

n.

Any small bracket; also, a console table.

8 : Consoler

n.

One who gives consolation.

9 : Gasolene

n.

See Gasoline.

10 : Girasole Girasol

n.

See Heliotrope.

11 : Girasole Girasol

n.

A variety of opal which is usually milk white, bluish white, or sky blue; but in a bright light it reflects a reddish color.

12 : Insole

n.

The inside sole of a boot or shoe; also, a loose, thin strip of leather, felt, etc., placed inside the shoe for warmth or ease.

13 : Insolence

n.

The quality of being unusual or novel.

14 : Insolence

n.

The quality of being insolent; pride or haughtiness manifested in contemptuous and overbearing treatment of others; arrogant contempt; brutal impudence.

15 : Insolence

n.

Insolent conduct or treatment; insult.

16 : Insolence

v. t.

To insult.

17 : Insolency

n.

Insolence.

18 : Insolent

a.

Deviating from that which is customary; novel; strange; unusual.

19 : Insolent

a.

Haughty and contemptuous or brutal in behavior or language; overbearing; domineering; grossly rude or disrespectful; saucy; as, an insolent master; an insolent servant.

20 : Insolent

a.

Proceeding from or characterized by insolence; insulting; as, insolent words or behavior.

21 : Insolently

adv.

In an insolent manner.

22 : Marysole

n.

A large British fluke, or flounder (Rhombus megastoma); -- called also carter, and whiff.

23 : Mausolean

a.

Pertaining to a mausoleum; monumental.

24 : Mausoleums

pl.

of Mausoleum

25 : Mausoleum

n.

A magnificent tomb, or stately sepulchral monument.

26 : Mesole

n.

Same as Thomsonite.

27 : Obsolesce

v. i.

To become obsolescent.

28 : Obsolescence

n.

The state of becoming obsolete.

29 : Obsolescent

a.

Going out of use; becoming obsolete; passing into desuetude.

30 : Obsolete

a.

No longer in use; gone into disuse; disused; neglected; as, an obsolete word; an obsolete statute; -- applied chiefly to words, writings, or observances.

31 : Obsolete

a.

Not very distinct; obscure; rudimental; imperfectly developed; abortive.

32 : Obsolete

v. i.

To become obsolete; to go out of use.

33 : Obsoletely

adv.

In an obsolete manner.

34 : Obsoleteness

n.

The state of being obsolete, or no longer used; a state of desuetude.

35 : Obsoleteness

n.

Indistinctness; want of development.

36 : Obsoletism

n.

A disused word or phrase; an archaism.

37 : Outsole

n.

The outside sole of a boot or shoe.

38 : Parasolette

n.

A small parasol.

39 : Rissole

n.

A small ball of rich minced meat or fish, covered with pastry and fried.

40 : Sole

n.

Any one of several species of flatfishes of the genus Solea and allied genera of the family Soleidae, especially the common European species (Solea vulgaris), which is a valuable food fish.

41 : Sole

n.

Any one of several American flounders somewhat resembling the true sole in form or quality, as the California sole (Lepidopsetta bilineata), the long-finned sole (Glyptocephalus zachirus), and other species.

42 : Sole

n.

The bottom of the foot; hence, also, rarely, the foot itself.

43 : Sole

n.

The bottom of a shoe or boot, or the piece of leather which constitutes the bottom.

44 : Sole

n.

The bottom or lower part of anything, or that on which anything rests in standing.

45 : Sole

n.

The bottom of the body of a plow; -- called also slade; also, the bottom of a furrow.

46 : Sole

n.

The horny substance under a horse's foot, which protects the more tender parts.

47 : Sole

n.

The bottom of an embrasure.

48 : Sole

n.

A piece of timber attached to the lower part of the rudder, to make it even with the false keel.

49 : Sole

n.

The seat or bottom of a mine; -- applied to horizontal veins or lodes.

50 : Soled

imp. & p. p.

of Sole

This word sole uses (4) total characters with white space

This word sole uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word sole uses 4 unique characters: E L O S

Number of all permutations npr for sole word is (24)

Number of all combination ncr for sole word is (24)

Similar matching soundex word for sole

2 same character containing word for sole

3 same character containing word For sole

4 same character containing word For sole

All permutations word for sole

All combinations word for sole

All similar letter combinations related to sole

From Wikipedia

Sole may refer to:

  • Sole (foot), the bottom of the foot
  • Sole (shoe), the bottom supporting member of the shoe

From Wiktionary

See also: Sole, solé, solę, søle, sołe, and so le

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Pronunciation
    • 1.2 Etymology 1
      • 1.2.1 Noun
    • 1.3 Etymology 2
      • 1.3.1 Alternative forms
      • 1.3.2 Noun
    • 1.4 Etymology 3
      • 1.4.1 Alternative forms
      • 1.4.2 Verb
    • 1.5 Etymology 4
      • 1.5.1 Adjective
        • 1.5.1.1 Derived terms
        • 1.5.1.2 Translations
    • 1.6 Etymology 5
      • 1.6.1 Noun
        • 1.6.1.1 Synonyms
        • 1.6.1.2 Derived terms
        • 1.6.1.3 Translations
      • 1.6.2 Verb
        • 1.6.2.1 Derived terms
        • 1.6.2.2 Translations
    • 1.7 Anagrams
  • 2 Danish
    • 2.1 Noun
  • 3 Esperanto
    • 3.1 Adverb
      • 3.1.1 Related terms
  • 4 French
    • 4.1 Etymology
    • 4.2 Pronunciation
    • 4.3 Noun
    • 4.4 Further reading
  • 5 Interlingue
    • 5.1 Noun
  • 6 Italian
    • 6.1 Pronunciation
    • 6.2 Etymology 1
      • 6.2.1 Noun
        • 6.2.1.1 Derived terms
        • 6.2.1.2 Related terms
      • 6.2.2 See also
      • 6.2.3 References
      • 6.2.4 Further reading
    • 6.3 Etymology 2
      • 6.3.1 Adjective
      • 6.3.2 Noun
    • 6.4 Anagrams
  • 7 Latin
    • 7.1 Etymology 1
      • 7.1.1 Pronunciation
      • 7.1.2 Noun
    • 7.2 Etymology 2
      • 7.2.1 Pronunciation
      • 7.2.2 Adjective
  • 8 Neapolitan
    • 8.1 Etymology
    • 8.2 Pronunciation
    • 8.3 Noun
  • 9 Norman
    • 9.1 Etymology
    • 9.2 Noun
  • 10 Norwegian Bokmål
    • 10.1 Etymology
    • 10.2 Verb
    • 10.3 References
  • 11 Old French
    • 11.1 Adjective
  • 12 Polish
    • 12.1 Pronunciation
    • 12.2 Noun

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:
sole
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /səʊl/
  • (US) enPR: sōl, IPA(key): /soʊl/
  • Rhymes: -əʊl
  • Homophones: soul, Seoul

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sole, soole, from Old English sāl (a rope, cord, line, bond, rein, door-hinge, necklace, collar), from Proto-Germanic *sailą, *sailaz (rope, cable), *sailō (noose, rein, bondage), from Proto-Indo-European *sey- (to tie to, tie together). Cognate with Scots sale, saile (halter, collar), Dutch zeel (rope, cord, strap), German Seil (rope, cable, wire), Icelandic seil (a string, line). Non-Germanic cognate include Albanian dell (sinew, vein).

Noun[edit]

sole (plural soles)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) A wooden band or yoke put around the neck of an ox or cow in the stall.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English, from Old English sol (mire, miry place), from Proto-Germanic *sulą (mire, wallow, mud), from Proto-Indo-European *sūl- (thick liquid). Cognate with Saterland Frisian soal (ditch), Dutch sol (water and mud filled pit), German Suhle (mire, wallow), Norwegian saula, søyla (mud puddle). More at soil.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • soal

Noun[edit]

sole (plural soles)

  1. (dialectal, Northern England) A pond or pool; a dirty pond of standing water.

Etymology 3[edit]

From earlier sowle (to pull by the ear). Origin unknown. Perhaps from sow (female pig) +‎ -le, as in the phrase "take a sow by the wrong ear", or from Middle English sole (rope). See above.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • soal, sowl

Verb[edit]

sole (third-person singular simple present soles, present participle soling, simple past and past participle soled)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To pull by the ears; to pull about; haul; lug.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English sole, soule, from Old French sol, soul (alone), from Latin sōlus (alone, single, solitary, lonely), of unknown origin. Perhaps related to Old Latin sollus (whole, complete), from Proto-Indo-European *solw-, *salw-, *slōw- (safe, healthy). More at save.

Adjective[edit]

sole (not comparable)

  1. only
  2. (law) unmarried (especially of a woman); widowed.
Derived terms[edit]
  • sole right
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

From Middle English sole, soole, from Old English. Reinforced by Anglo-Norman, Old French sole, from Vulgar Latin *sola ("bottom of the shoe", also "flatfish"), from Latin solea (sandal, bottom of the shoe), from Proto-Indo-European *swol- (sole). Cognate with Dutch zool (sole, tread), German Sohle (sole, insole, bottom, floor), Danish sål (sole), Icelandic sóli (sole, outsole), Gothic 𐍃𐌿𐌻𐌾𐌰 (sulja, sandal). Related to Latin solum (bottom, ground, soil). More at soil.

Noun[edit]

sole (plural soles)

The sole of a man's foot
  1. (anatomy) The bottom or plantar surface of the foot.
  2. (footwear) The bottom of a shoe or boot.
    • Arbuthnot
      The caliga was a military shoe, with a very thick sole, tied above the instep.
  3. (obsolete) The foot itself.
    • Bible, Genesis viii. 9
      The dove found no rest for the sole of her foot.
    • Spenser
      Hast wandered through the world now long a day, / Yet ceasest not thy weary soles to lead.
  4. Solea solea, a flatfish of the family Soleidae.
  5. The bottom or lower part of anything, or that on which anything rests in standing.
    1. The bottom of the body of a plough; the slade.
    2. The bottom of a furrow.
    3. The end section of the chanter of a set of bagpipes.
    4. The horny substance under a horse's foot, which protects the more tender parts.
    5. (military) The bottom of an embrasure.
    6. (nautical) A piece of timber attached to the lower part of the rudder, to make it even with the false keel.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  6. (mining) The seat or bottom of a mine; applied to horizontal veins or lodes.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (bottom of the foot): planta (medical term)
Derived terms[edit]
  • insole
  • midsole
  • outsole
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sole (third-person singular simple present soles, present participle soling, simple past and past participle soled)

  1. (transitive) to put a sole on (a shoe or boot)
Derived terms[edit]
  • resole
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

  • EOLs, ESOL, Leos, leos, lose, sloe

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sole c

  1. plural indefinite of sol

Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sole

  1. solely

Related terms[edit]

  • sola

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sola, from Latin solea.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɔl/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

sole f (plural soles)

  1. sole (fish)
  2. sole, the bottom of a hoof
  3. sole, a piece of timber, a joist
  4. a piece of land devoted to crop rotation

Further reading[edit]

  • “sole” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Interlingue[edit]

Noun[edit]

sole

  1. sun

Italian[edit]

Rappresentazione del sole – Depiction of the sun

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈso.le/, [ˈs̪oːl̺e]
  • Stress: sóle
  • Hyphenation: so‧le

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sōlem, accusative case of sōl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.
Cognates include Greek ήλιος (ílios), Icelandic sól, Hindi सूर्य (sūrya), and Russian со́лнце (sólnce).

Noun[edit]

sole m (plural soli)

  1. Sun (star the Earth revolves around)
  2. sunlight
    • 1807, Ugo Foscolo, Dei Sepolcri[1], Molini, Landi e comp., published 1809, page 20:
      E tu onore di pianti, Ettore, avrai ¶ [] finché il Sole ¶ Risplenderà sulle sciagure umane.
      And you, Hector, will be honored with cryings ¶ [] as long as the Sun ¶ will shine on the misfortunes of mankind.
  3. (poetic) daytime, day (the interval between sunrise and sunset)
    • 1504, Jacopo Sannazaro, Arcadia (in Italian):
      quattro soli e altretante lune il mio corpo né da cibo né da sonno fu riconfortato
      for four days and as many nights, my body hadn't been comforted by either food or sleep
    • 1516, Ludovico Ariosto, Orlando Furioso [Raging Roland][2] (in Italian), Venice: Printed by Gabriel Giolito, published 1551, Canto XXXV, page 164:
      Poi diſſe andiamo; e nel ſeguente ſole ¶ Giunſero al fiume
      He then said "Let us go"; and in the following day ¶ they reached the river
    • 1581, Torquato Tasso, Gerusalemme liberata [Jerusalem Delivered][3], Erasmo Viotti, Canto XIX, page 441:
      Goffredo alloggia ne la Terra: e vuole ¶ Rinouar poi l'aſſalto al nouo Sole
      Within the land Godfrey would lodge that night, ¶ and with the day renew the assault and fight.
    • 1825, Vincenzo Monti, transl., Iliade [Iliad][4], Milan: Giovanni Resnati e Gius. Bernardoni di Gio, translation of Ἰλιάς (Iliás) by Homer, published 1840, Book XIX, page 424:
      Intero un sole al lagrimar si doni; ¶ Poi con coraggio, chi morì s'intombi
      Let an entire day be dedicated to the mourning; ¶ then with bravery, let us bury those who died
  4. (poetic) year
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno [The Divine Comedy: Hell] (paperback, in Italian), 12th edition, Le Monnier, published 1994, Canto VI, lines 67–69, page 94:
      Poi appresso convien che questa caggia ¶ infra tre soli, e che l'altra sormonti ¶ con la forza di tal che testé piaggia.
      Then afterwards behoves it this one fall ¶ within three suns, and rise again the other ¶ by force of him who now is on the coast.
  5. (poetic, in the plural) eyes
    • 1516, Ludovico Ariosto, Orlando Furioso [Raging Roland][5] (in Italian), Venice: Printed by Gabriel Giolito, published 1551, Canto VII, page 26:
      Sotto duo negri e ſottilisſimi archi ¶ Son duo negri occhi, anzi duo chiari Soli
      Below two thin, black eyebrows ¶ are two black eyes; nay, two bright suns
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • sole in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti
  • sole in Collins Italian-English Dictionary

Further reading[edit]

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg sole on the Italian Wikipedia.Wikipedia it

Etymology 2[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Adjective[edit]

sole

  1. feminine plural of solo

Noun[edit]

sole f

  1. plural of sola

Anagrams[edit]

  • leso

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See sōl.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈsoː.le/

Noun[edit]

sōle

  1. ablative singular of sōl

Etymology 2[edit]

See sōlus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈsoː.le/

Adjective[edit]

sōle

  1. vocative masculine singular of sōlus

Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sol.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsolɐ/

Noun[edit]

sole m

  1. the Sun, the star around which the Earth revolves (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sola, from Latin solea.

Noun[edit]

sole f (plural soles)

  1. sole (fish)

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably from the noun sol

Verb[edit]

sole (imperative sol, present tense soler, passive -, simple past sola or solet or solte, past participle sola or solet or solt, present participle solende)

  1. (reflexive) sole seg - to sunbathe, sun oneself, bask (also figurative)

References[edit]

  • “sole” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sole f

  1. oblique feminine singular of sol
  2. nominative feminine singular of sol

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

sole

  1. nominative plural of sól
  2. accusative plural of sól
  3. vocative plural of sól
  4. nominative plural of sola
  5. accusative plural of sola
  6. vocative plural of sola
  7. nominative plural of sol
  8. accusative plural of sol
  9. vocative plural of sol