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1 : A bulbous iridaceous plant (Crocus sativus) having blue flowers with large yellow stigmas. See Crocus.

2 : The aromatic, pungent, dried stigmas, usually with part of the stile, of the Crocus sativus. Saffron is used in cookery, and in coloring confectionery, liquors, varnishes, etc., and was formerly much used in medicine.

3 : An orange or deep yellow color, like that of the stigmas of the Crocus sativus.

4 : Having the color of the stigmas of saffron flowers; deep orange-yellow; as, a saffron face; a saffron streamer.

5 : To give color and flavor to, as by means of saffron; to spice.

6 : Having a color somewhat like saffron; yellowish.

(6) words is found which contain saffron in our database

For saffron word found data is following....

1 : Saffron

n.

A bulbous iridaceous plant (Crocus sativus) having blue flowers with large yellow stigmas. See Crocus.

2 : Saffron

n.

The aromatic, pungent, dried stigmas, usually with part of the stile, of the Crocus sativus. Saffron is used in cookery, and in coloring confectionery, liquors, varnishes, etc., and was formerly much used in medicine.

3 : Saffron

n.

An orange or deep yellow color, like that of the stigmas of the Crocus sativus.

4 : Saffron

a.

Having the color of the stigmas of saffron flowers; deep orange-yellow; as, a saffron face; a saffron streamer.

5 : Saffron

v. t.

To give color and flavor to, as by means of saffron; to spice.

6 : Saffrony

a.

Having a color somewhat like saffron; yellowish.

This word saffron uses (7) total characters with white space

This word saffron uses (7) total characters with white out space

This word saffron uses 6 unique characters: A F N O R S

Number of all permutations npr for saffron word is (720)

Number of all combination ncr for saffron word is (720)

Similar matching soundex word for saffron

2 same character containing word for saffron

3 same character containing word For saffron

All permutations word for saffron

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All similar letter combinations related to saffron

From Wikipedia

Saffron crocus, Crocus sativus, with its vivid crimson stigmas and styles
Delicate saffron threads, plucked from crocus flowers and dried

Saffron (pronounced /ˈsæfrən/ or /ˈsæfrɒn/)[1] is a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, commonly known as the "saffron crocus". The vivid crimson stigmas and styles, called threads, are collected and dried to be used mainly as a seasoning and colouring agent in food. Saffron, long among the world's most costly spices by weight,[2][3][4] was probably first cultivated in or near Greece.[5] C. sativus is probably a form of C. cartwrightianus, that emerged by human cultivators selectively breeding plants for unusually long stigmas in late Bronze Age Crete.[6] It slowly propagated throughout much of Eurasia and was later brought to parts of North Africa, North America, and Oceania.

Saffron's taste and iodoform or hay-like fragrance result from the chemicals picrocrocin and safranal.[7][8] It also contains a carotenoid pigment, crocin, which imparts a rich golden-yellow hue to dishes and textiles. Its recorded history is attested in a 7th-century BC Assyrian botanical treatise compiled under Ashurbanipal,[9] and it has been traded and used for over four millennia. Iran now accounts for approximately 90% of the world production of saffron.[10]

  1. ^ "Saffron – Definition and More". Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 21 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Rau 1969, p. 53.
  3. ^ Hill 2004, p. 272.
  4. ^ "World's COSTLIEST spice blooms in Kashmir". Rediff. Retrieved 7 January 2013. 
  5. ^ McGee 2004, p. 422.
  6. ^ Negbi 1999, p. 1.
  7. ^ McGee 2004, p. 423.
  8. ^ Katzer, G. (2010). "Saffron (Crocus sativus L.)". Gernot Katzer's Spice Pages. Retrieved 1 December 2012. 
  9. ^ Russo, Dreher & Mathre 2003, p. 6.
  10. ^ Ghorbani 2008, p. 1.

From Wiktionary

See also: Saffron

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Noun
      • 1.2.1 Usage notes
      • 1.2.2 Synonyms
      • 1.2.3 Translations
      • 1.2.4 References
    • 1.3 Adjective
      • 1.3.1 Translations
    • 1.4 Verb
      • 1.4.1 Translations
    • 1.5 Derived terms
    • 1.6 Related terms
    • 1.7 See also
    • 1.8 References

English[edit]

Crocus sativus
saffron (spice): the dried threads from the stigma of Crocus sativus

Etymology[edit]

From Old French safran, from Medieval Latin safranum, from Arabic زَعْفَرَان‏ (zaʿfarān), from Persian *زرپران‏ (*zar-parân, literally with golden leaves).

Noun[edit]

saffron (countable and uncountable, plural saffrons)

  1. The plant Crocus sativus, a crocus.
    • 2009, D. H. Sanaeinejad, S. N. Hosseini, Regression Models for Saffron Yields in Iran, Daoliang Li, Chunjiang Zhao (editors), Computer and Computing Technologies in Agriculture II, Volume 1, page 510,
      Usually the maximum temperature for October, November and December in the southern parts of Khorassan–the main saffron growing area of the Iran-does not exceed 20°C, while the minimum temperature reaches 0°C.
  2. A spice (seasoning) and colouring agent made from the stigma and part of the style of the plant, sometimes or formerly also used as a dye and insect repellent.
    • c. 1430 (reprinted 1888), Thomas Austin, ed., Two Fifteenth-century Cookery-books. Harleian ms. 279 (ab. 1430), & Harl. ms. 4016 (ab. 1450), with Extracts from Ashmole ms. 1429, Laud ms. 553, & Douce ms. 55 [Early English Text Society, Original Series; 91], London: N. Trübner & Co. for the Early English Text Society, volume I, OCLC 374760, page 11:
      Soupes dorye. — Take gode almaunde mylke [] caste þher-to Safroun an Salt []
    • 1658, Thomas Muffet, The Theatre of Insects, [1634, Insectorum sive Minimorum Animalium Theatrum], quoted in 2008, Anna Suranyi, The Genius of the English Nation: Travel Writing and National Identity in Early Modern England, page 117-118,
      The Irish and Ireland people (who are frequently troubled with lice, and such as will fly, as they say, in summer) anoint their shirts with saffron, and to very good purpose, to drive away the lice, but after six months they wash their shirts again, putting fresh saffron into the lye.
    • 2002, James A. Duke (editor), CRC Handbook of Medicinal Spices[1], page 129:
      Saffron is not included in American and British pharmacopoeias, but some Indian medical formulae still include it.
    • 2004, Melitta Weiss Adamson, Food in Medieval Times[2], page 15:
      Saffron is the stigma of the crocus flower, which is harvested by hand, dried, and sold either in strands or ground to powder. [] Of all the medieval spices, saffron was the most expensive, which is not surprising given that 70,000 flowers only yield one pound of dried stigmas. In the European cookbooks of the late Middle Ages, nearly all of which which reflect refined upper-class dining, saffron is ubiquitous.
    • 2011, Mathew Attokaran, Natural Food Flavors and Colorants, unnumbered page,
      Saffron is often called the “golden spice.”
  3. An orange-yellow colour, the colour of a lion's pelt.
    saffron colour:  
    • 1973, Anthony Powell, Temporary Kings[3], page 82:
      These colours might have been expressly designed—by dissonance as much as harmony—for juxtaposition against those pouring down in brilliant rays of light from the Tiepolo; subtle yet penetrating pinks and greys, light blue turning almost to lavender, rich saffrons and cinnamons melting into bronze and gold.
    • 2011, Seth Hunter, The Winds of Folly, unnumbered page,
      The classical shades of Antiquity were the most prevalent, but along with the Venetian reds and Egyptian blues, the saffrons and ochres and indigos, were more delicate hues: of pink and cream and lilac, like shells littered upon the shore.

Usage notes[edit]

The distinction between the plant and spice senses is often blurred.

Synonyms[edit]

  • (spice): kesar
  • (colour): saffron yellow

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

References[edit]

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg saffron on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Wikispecies-logo.svg Crocus sativus on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • Commons-logo.svg Crocus sativus on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Adjective[edit]

saffron

  1. Having an orange-yellow colour.

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

saffron (third-person singular simple present saffrons, present participle saffroning, simple past and past participle saffroned)

  1. To add saffron to, for taste, colour etc.

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • bastard saffron (Cassine peragua)
  • dyer's saffron (Carthamus tinctorius)
  • meadow saffron (Colchicum autumnale)
  • saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola)
  • saffronize
  • saffronization
  • saffron terror
  • Saffron Walden
  • saffron wood
  • saffron yellow

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

  • autumn crocus
  • crocein
  • crocoite
  • crocus
  • curcuma
  • kumkum
  • colchicum
  • crocus bag
  • crocus sack
  • turmeric
  • Appendix:Colors

References[edit]

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Crocus sativus on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Wikispecies-logo.svg Crocus sativus on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • Commons-logo.svg Crocus sativus on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons