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1 : To thrust away.

2 : Harsh and offensive, as a color; tawdry or in bad taste, as a combination of colors, or any design or work of art.

3 : Having, or displaying, superficial and undigested knowledge; without culture or profundity; as, a crude reasoner.

4 : Undigested; unconcocted; not brought into a form to give nourishment.

5 : Not reduced to order or form; unfinished; not arranged or prepared; ill-considered; immature.

6 : Unripe; not mature or perfect; immature.

7 : In its natural state; not cooked or prepared by fire or heat; undressed; not altered, refined, or prepared for use by any artificial process; raw; as, crude flesh.

8 : In a crude, immature manner.

9 : A crude, undigested, or unprepared state; rawness; unripeness; immatureness; unfitness for a destined use or purpose; as, the crudeness of iron ore; crudeness of theories or plans.

10 : To thrust down or out; to push down with force.

11 : of Detrude

12 : To thrust out; to force, press, or push out; to expel; to drive off or away.

13 : of Extrude

14 : The quality or state of being imprudent; want to caution, circumspection, or a due regard to consequences; indiscretion; inconsideration; reshness; also, an imprudent act; as, he was guilty of an imprudence.

15 : Not prudent; wanting in prudence or discretion; indiscreet; injudicious; not attentive to consequence; improper.

16 : To thrust one's self in; to come or go in without invitation, permission, or welcome; to encroach; to trespass; as, to intrude on families at unseasonable hours; to intrude on the lands of another.

17 : The cause to enter or force a way, as into the crevices of rocks.

18 : To enter by force; to invade.

19 : To thrust or force (something) in or upon; especially, to force (one's self) in without leave or welcome; as, to intrude one's presence into a conference; to intrude one's opinions upon another.

20 : of Intrude

21 : Same as Intrusive.

22 : One who intrudes; one who thrusts himself in, or enters without right, or without leave or welcome; a trespasser.

23 : The science of juridical law; the knowledge of the laws, customs, and rights of men in a state or community, necessary for the due administration of justice.

24 : One skilled in law or jurisprudence.

25 : Understanding law; skilled in jurisprudence.

26 : Of or pertaining to jurisprudence.

27 : To thrust one's self upon a company or upon attention; to intrude.

28 : To offer with unreasonable importunity; to urge unduly or against the will.

29 : To thrust impertinently; to present without warrant or solicitation; as, to obtrude one's self upon a company.

30 : of Obtrude

31 : One who obtrudes.

32 : To shoot out or forth; to be thrust forward; to extend beyond a limit; to project.

33 : To thrust out, as through a narrow orifice or from confinement; to cause to come forth.

34 : To thrust forward; to drive or force along.

35 : of Protrude

36 : A woman of affected modesty, reserve, or coyness; one who is overscrupulous or sensitive; one who affects extraordinary prudence in conduct and speech.

37 : The quality or state of being prudent; wisdom in the way of caution and provision; discretion; carefulness; hence, also, economy; frugality.

38 : Prudence.

39 : Frugal; economical; not extravagant; as, a prudent woman; prudent expenditure of money.

40 : Sagacious in adapting means to ends; circumspect in action, or in determining any line of conduct; practically wise; judicious; careful; discreet; sensible; -- opposed to rash; as, a prudent man; dictated or directed by prudence or wise forethought; evincing prudence; as, prudent behavior.

41 : That which relates to or demands the exercise of, discretion or prudence; -- usually in the pl.

42 : Exercising prudence; discretionary; advisory; superintending or executive; as, a prudential committee.

43 : Proceeding from, or dictated or characterized by, prudence; prudent; discreet; sometimes, selfish or pecuniary as distinguished from higher motives or influences; as, prudential motives.

44 : One who is governed by, or acts from, prudential motives.

45 : The quality or state of being prudential.

46 : In a prudential manner; prudently.

47 : In a prudent manner.

48 : of Prudery

49 : The quality or state of being prudish; excessive or affected scrupulousness in speech or conduct; stiffness; coyness.

50 : Recrudescence.

(50) words is found which contain rude in our database

For rude word found data is following....

1 : Abstrude

v. t.

To thrust away.

2 : Crude

superl.

Harsh and offensive, as a color; tawdry or in bad taste, as a combination of colors, or any design or work of art.

3 : Crude

superl.

Having, or displaying, superficial and undigested knowledge; without culture or profundity; as, a crude reasoner.

4 : Crude

superl.

Undigested; unconcocted; not brought into a form to give nourishment.

5 : Crude

superl.

Not reduced to order or form; unfinished; not arranged or prepared; ill-considered; immature.

6 : Crude

superl.

Unripe; not mature or perfect; immature.

7 : Crude

superl.

In its natural state; not cooked or prepared by fire or heat; undressed; not altered, refined, or prepared for use by any artificial process; raw; as, crude flesh.

8 : Crudely

adv.

In a crude, immature manner.

9 : Crudeness

n.

A crude, undigested, or unprepared state; rawness; unripeness; immatureness; unfitness for a destined use or purpose; as, the crudeness of iron ore; crudeness of theories or plans.

10 : Detrude

v. t.

To thrust down or out; to push down with force.

11 : Detruded

imp. & p. p.

of Detrude

12 : Extrude

v. t.

To thrust out; to force, press, or push out; to expel; to drive off or away.

13 : Extruded

imp. & p. p.

of Extrude

14 : Imprudence

n.

The quality or state of being imprudent; want to caution, circumspection, or a due regard to consequences; indiscretion; inconsideration; reshness; also, an imprudent act; as, he was guilty of an imprudence.

15 : Imprudent

a.

Not prudent; wanting in prudence or discretion; indiscreet; injudicious; not attentive to consequence; improper.

16 : Intrude

v. i.

To thrust one's self in; to come or go in without invitation, permission, or welcome; to encroach; to trespass; as, to intrude on families at unseasonable hours; to intrude on the lands of another.

17 : Intrude

v. t.

The cause to enter or force a way, as into the crevices of rocks.

18 : Intrude

v. t.

To enter by force; to invade.

19 : Intrude

v. t.

To thrust or force (something) in or upon; especially, to force (one's self) in without leave or welcome; as, to intrude one's presence into a conference; to intrude one's opinions upon another.

20 : Intruded

imp. & p. p.

of Intrude

21 : Intruded

p. a.

Same as Intrusive.

22 : Intruder

n.

One who intrudes; one who thrusts himself in, or enters without right, or without leave or welcome; a trespasser.

23 : Jurisprudence

a.

The science of juridical law; the knowledge of the laws, customs, and rights of men in a state or community, necessary for the due administration of justice.

24 : Jurisprudent

n.

One skilled in law or jurisprudence.

25 : Jurisprudent

a.

Understanding law; skilled in jurisprudence.

26 : Jurisprudential

a.

Of or pertaining to jurisprudence.

27 : Obtrude

v. i.

To thrust one's self upon a company or upon attention; to intrude.

28 : Obtrude

v. t.

To offer with unreasonable importunity; to urge unduly or against the will.

29 : Obtrude

v. t.

To thrust impertinently; to present without warrant or solicitation; as, to obtrude one's self upon a company.

30 : Obtruded

imp. & p. p.

of Obtrude

31 : Obtruder

n.

One who obtrudes.

32 : Protrude

v. i.

To shoot out or forth; to be thrust forward; to extend beyond a limit; to project.

33 : Protrude

v. t.

To thrust out, as through a narrow orifice or from confinement; to cause to come forth.

34 : Protrude

v. t.

To thrust forward; to drive or force along.

35 : Protruded

imp. & p. p.

of Protrude

36 : Prude

a.

A woman of affected modesty, reserve, or coyness; one who is overscrupulous or sensitive; one who affects extraordinary prudence in conduct and speech.

37 : Prudence

n.

The quality or state of being prudent; wisdom in the way of caution and provision; discretion; carefulness; hence, also, economy; frugality.

38 : Prudency

n.

Prudence.

39 : Prudent

a.

Frugal; economical; not extravagant; as, a prudent woman; prudent expenditure of money.

40 : Prudent

a.

Sagacious in adapting means to ends; circumspect in action, or in determining any line of conduct; practically wise; judicious; careful; discreet; sensible; -- opposed to rash; as, a prudent man; dictated or directed by prudence or wise forethought; evincing prudence; as, prudent behavior.

41 : Prudential

n.

That which relates to or demands the exercise of, discretion or prudence; -- usually in the pl.

42 : Prudential

a.

Exercising prudence; discretionary; advisory; superintending or executive; as, a prudential committee.

43 : Prudential

a.

Proceeding from, or dictated or characterized by, prudence; prudent; discreet; sometimes, selfish or pecuniary as distinguished from higher motives or influences; as, prudential motives.

44 : Prudentialist

n.

One who is governed by, or acts from, prudential motives.

45 : Prudentiality

n.

The quality or state of being prudential.

46 : Prudentially

adv.

In a prudential manner; prudently.

47 : Prudently

adv.

In a prudent manner.

48 : Pruderies

pl.

of Prudery

49 : Prudery

n.

The quality or state of being prudish; excessive or affected scrupulousness in speech or conduct; stiffness; coyness.

50 : Recrudency

n.

Recrudescence.

This word rude uses (4) total characters with white space

This word rude uses (4) total characters with white out space

This word rude uses 4 unique characters: D E R U

Number of all permutations npr for rude word is (24)

Number of all combination ncr for rude word is (24)

Similar matching soundex word for rude

2 same character containing word for rude

3 same character containing word For rude

4 same character containing word For rude

All permutations word for rude

All combinations word for rude

All similar letter combinations related to rude

From Wikipedia

Redirect to:

  • Rudeness
  • From a related word or phrase: This is a redirect from a word (or phrase) to a page title that is related in some way. This redirect might be a good candidate for a Wiktionary link.
    • Redirects from related words are not properly redirects from alternative spellings of the same word. They are also different from redirects that are subtopics or related terms/topics, because unlike those, a related word or phrase probably does not warrant its own subtopic section in the target page or possess the possibility of ever becoming an article, template, project page, and so forth.

From Wiktionary

See also: Rude, rüde, and Rüde

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Adjective
      • 1.3.1 Synonyms
      • 1.3.2 Derived terms
      • 1.3.3 Translations
      • 1.3.4 Further reading
    • 1.4 Anagrams
  • 2 Catalan
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Pronunciation
    • 2.3 Adjective
      • 2.3.1 Derived terms
    • 2.4 Further reading
  • 3 Danish
    • 3.1 Pronunciation
    • 3.2 Etymology 1
      • 3.2.1 Noun
        • 3.2.1.1 Inflection
    • 3.3 Etymology 2
    • 3.4 Noun
      • 3.4.1 Inflection
    • 3.5 See also
  • 4 French
    • 4.1 Etymology
    • 4.2 Pronunciation
    • 4.3 Adjective
      • 4.3.1 Derived terms
    • 4.4 Anagrams
    • 4.5 Further reading
  • 5 Friulian
    • 5.1 Etymology
    • 5.2 Noun
  • 6 Italian
    • 6.1 Etymology
    • 6.2 Adjective
    • 6.3 Anagrams
  • 7 Latin
    • 7.1 Adjective
    • 7.2 References
  • 8 Norman
    • 8.1 Etymology
    • 8.2 Adjective
      • 8.2.1 Derived terms
  • 9 Portuguese
    • 9.1 Etymology
    • 9.2 Pronunciation
    • 9.3 Adjective
      • 9.3.1 Synonyms
  • 10 Venetian
    • 10.1 Noun

English[edit]

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Please see the discussion on Requests for cleanup(+) for more information and remove this template after the problem has been dealt with.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin rudis (rough, raw, rude, wild, untilled).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹuːd/ enPR: ro͞od
  • (Southeastern English) IPA(key): [ɹɨːd]
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɹud/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ɹoːd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːd

Adjective[edit]

rude (comparative ruder, superlative rudest)

  1. Bad-mannered.
    This girl was so rude towards her boyfriend by screaming at him for no apparent reason.
    Karen broke up with Fred because he was often rude to her.
  2. Somewhat obscene, pornographic, offensive.
  3. Tough, robust.
  4. Undeveloped, unskilled, basic.
    • 2 Corinthians 11:6 (KVJ)
      But though I be rude in speech, yet not in knowledge
    • (Can we date this quote?), Rudyard Kipling, The Conundrum of the Workshops
      When the flush of a new-born sun fell first on Eden's green and gold,
      Our father Adam sat under the Tree and scratched with a stick in the mould;
      And the first rude sketch that the world had seen was joy to his mighty heart,
      Till the Devil whispered behind the leaves, "It's pretty, but is it Art?"
    • 1767, Adam Ferguson, An Essay on the History of Civil Society
      It might be apprehended, that among rude nations, where the means of subsistence are procured with so much difficulty, the mind could never raise itself above the consideration of this subject
  5. Hearty, vigorous; found particularly in the phrase rude health.

Synonyms[edit]

  • See also Wikisaurus:impolite

Derived terms[edit]

  • rudeness

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further reading[edit]

  • rude in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • rude in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • rude at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams[edit]

  • Duer, dure, rued, ured

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rudis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈru.də/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈru.de/

Adjective[edit]

rude (masculine and feminine plural rudes)

  1. uncultured, rough

Derived terms[edit]

  • rudement
  • rudesa

Further reading[edit]

  • “rude” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ruːdə/, [ˈʁuːðə]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Low German rūte, from Old High German rūta (German Raute (rhomb)), probably from Latin rūta (rue).

Noun[edit]

rude c (singular definite ruden, plural indefinite ruder)

  1. pane
  2. window
  3. square
  4. lozenge, diamond
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From late Old Norse rúta, from Middle Low German rūde, from Latin rūta (rue).

Noun[edit]

rude c (singular definite ruden, plural indefinite ruder)

  1. (botany) rue (various perennial shrubs of the genus Ruta)
Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]

  • ruder
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg rude on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Rude-familien on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin rudis.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʁyd/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

rude (plural rudes)

  1. rough, harsh
  2. tough, hard; severe
  3. crude, unpolished
  4. hardy, tough, rugged
  5. (informal) formidable, fearsome

Derived terms[edit]

  • rudement

Anagrams[edit]

  • dure, duré, redû

Further reading[edit]

  • “rude” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rūta, from Ancient Greek ῥυτή (rhutḗ).

Noun[edit]

rude f (plural rudis)

  1. rue (Ruta graveolens)

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rudis, rudem.

Adjective[edit]

rude (invariable)

  1. tough
  2. rough, coarse

Anagrams[edit]

  • dure

Latin[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rude

  1. nominative neuter singular of rudis
  2. accusative neuter singular of rudis
  3. vocative neuter singular of rudis

References[edit]

  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “rude”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rudis.

Adjective[edit]

rude m, f

  1. (Jersey) rough

Derived terms[edit]

  • rudement

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin rudis

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Rhymes: -udʒi

Adjective[edit]

rude m, f (plural rudes, comparable)

  1. rude; bad-mannered

Synonyms[edit]

  • brusco, grosseiro, mal-educado

Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rude

  1. plural of ruda