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The word noblesse uses 8 total characters with white space

The word noblesse uses 8 total characters with white out space

The word "noblesse" uses 6 unique characters: B E L N O S

Number of all permutations npr for noblesse 720

Number of all combination ncr for noblesse 720

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From Wikipedia

In Scotland, Scottish armigers are those individuals awarded personal arms by the Court of the Lord Lyon, and are an indication of nobility (either peerage or non-peerage in rank).[1] All Scottish armigers are ennobled in their grant or matriculation of arms awarded by the Crown or Sovereign through the Court of the Lord Lyon, and by issuance of a warrant from the Lord Lyon King of Arms are so entered in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland through official "Ensigns of Nobility".[2][3] Without such legal arms it is practically impossible to prove one's nobiliary status.[4] Sir Thomas Innes of Learney, Lord Lyon King of Arm, also states, "Technically, a grant of arms from the Lord Lyon is a patent of nobility (also referred to a 'Diploma of Nobility'); the Grantee is thereby 'enrolled with all nobles in the noblesse of Scotland."[5]

According to the Court of Session[6] in a decision delivered by Lord Marnoch, he sites the 2nd edition of Scots Heraldry at p. 198, Sir Thomas Innes of Learney, Lord Lyon writes:

“The name in which a person is granted arms is, however, a ‘name of dignity’ (i.e., of the dignity of Gentleman) and in the nature of a 'title' if it comprehends a feudal designation.”

As such, a Scottish armiger is recognized under Scottish heraldic law as within the non-peerage rank of Gentleman, which is so recognized under Scots law as a social dignity. Given this court decision, the term "nobility" should be avoided, as it has long been confined in Britain to the peerage, or someone of official social rank (Dukes, Marquises, Earls, Viscounts, Barons, etc.). Instead, it is more appropriate to use the term 'Noblesse' in the context of the French definition, which includes the non-peerage rank of Gentlemen. A Gentleman is the lowest rank of gentry, standing below an esquire and above a yeoman. It includes the untitled and minor nobility - the noblesse, to whom rightly belong lairds (those with territorial designations), Esquires and Gentlemen, "known" through the grant or matriculation of armorial bearings.

The dignity of Esquire (post-nominal Esq.) is an official title in Scotland,[citation needed] unlike other parts of the world. For example, attorneys in the United States use "Esquire" as a courtesy title, and it is used by both men and women. In Scotland, the title is exclusively used by men, never women. Scottish armigers who are not peers, feudal barons, or lairds with territorial designations are addressed in correspondence as a post nominal Esq. by the Court of the Lord Lyon.

If associated with a particular Scottish clan, armigers are the noblesse gentry of their clan, with a duty and responsibility for the management of their clan in our time; and thereby bound to the principles of noblesse oblige.

  1. ^ Edmondson, Complete Body of Heraldry, p. 154
  2. ^ Nisbet's Heraldry, iii, ii, 65
  3. ^ Sir Thomas Innes of Learney, Scots Heraldry, p. 20
  4. ^ Cf: Innes of Learney, Sir Thomas (Lord Lyon King of Arms): Scots Heraldry, 2nd ed. [1956] p. 20f; 3rd ed. [1978] p. 13
  5. ^ Burnett, Charles J and Dennis, Mark D. Scotland's Heraldic Heritage; The Lion Rejoicing The Stationery Office, Edinburgh, 1997
  6. ^ 15 July 2009 - in a case between (FIRST) THE MUCH HONOURED STEPHEN PENDARIES KERR OF ARDGOWAN; (SECOND) EUR ING DAVID AYRE OF KILMARNOCK, BARON OF KILMARNOCK; and (THIRD) MARTIN STEPHEN JAMES GOLDSTRAW OF WHITECAIRNS vs. ROBIN BLAIR ESQ., THE LORD LYON KING OF ARMS, Section 9

From Wiktionary

See also: Noblesse

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Noun
    • 1.4 Anagrams
  • 2 French
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Pronunciation
    • 2.3 Noun
    • 2.4 Further reading

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Anglo-Norman noblesse, noblesce et al., Old French noblace, nobleche et al., from noble (noble).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /nə(ʊ)ˈblɛs/

Noun[edit]

noblesse (usually uncountable, plural noblesses)

  1. The quality of being noble; nobleness.
    • c. 1395, Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Clerk's Tale’, The Canterbury Tales, Ellesmere ms:
      I yow took/ out of youre pouere array / And putte yow / in estaat of heigh noblesse.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter x, in Le Morte Darthur, book XIX:
      his moder had discouerd in her pryde / how she had wroughte that by enchauntement / soo that he shold neuer be hole vntyl the best knyghte of the world had serched his woundes / [] / And yf I fayle to hele hym here in this land I wylle neuer take more payne vpon me / and that is pyte for he was a good knyghte and of grete noblenes
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)
  2. The nobility; peerage.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.8:
      Faire braunch of noblesse, flowre of cheualrie, / That with your worth the world amazed make, / How shall I quite the paines, ye suffer for my sake?
    (Can we find and add a quotation of John Dryden to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]

  • boneless

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French, see noble +‎ -esse

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɔblɛs/

Noun[edit]

noblesse f (uncountable)

  1. nobility

Further reading[edit]

  • “noblesse” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).